A Quotation from David Bohm

In his book Wholeness and the Implicate Order the American born quantum physicist David Bohm (1917–92) has some interesting remarks on music. The book is actually dealing with certain aspects of quantum physic, which could not be explained by the so-called Copenhagen Interpretation, but in order to make the theory more comprehensible Bohm, who also was a great connoisseur of music, makes this comparison (the italics are Bohm's):

"In the music, there is . . . a basically similar transformation (of notes) in which a certain order can also be seen to be preserved. The key difference in these two cases is that for our model of the electron an enfolded order is grasped in thought, as the presence together of many different but interrelated degrees of transformations of ensembles, while for the music, it is sensed immediately as the presence together of many different but interrelated degrees of transformations of tones and sounds. In the latter, there is a feeling of both tension and harmony between the various copresent transformations, and this feeling is indeed what is primary in the apprehension of the music in its undivided state of flowing movement. In listening to music, one is therefore directly perceiving an implicate order. Evidently this order is active in the sense that it continually flows into emotional, physical, and other responses, that are inseparable from the transformations out of which it is essentially constituted."

I became aware of Bohm's book after having developed my own theory, but I immediately realized, that the order in which the tones appear in the musical scales is the same as Bohm calls the implicate order, and since then I had used this term myself.